20/7 


Like, I don’t know how I feel about his legs being that skinny. I mean, damn. I think I’m more jealous of his legs than attracted to them right now

Like, I don’t know how I feel about his legs being that skinny. I mean, damn. I think I’m more jealous of his legs than attracted to them right now

(via whataboutneil)

“I am learning every day to allow the space between where I am and where I want to be to inspire me and not terrify me.”
foodffs:

Poached Egg on Toast with Chipotle Mayonnaise, Bacon and Avocado
Really nice recipes. Every hour.

These look so good. I need more healthy(ish) breakfasts in my life foodffs:

Poached Egg on Toast with Chipotle Mayonnaise, Bacon and Avocado
Really nice recipes. Every hour.

These look so good. I need more healthy(ish) breakfasts in my life foodffs:

Poached Egg on Toast with Chipotle Mayonnaise, Bacon and Avocado
Really nice recipes. Every hour.

These look so good. I need more healthy(ish) breakfasts in my life

darklordflareon:

he died a hero’s death

I love that one dog that’s just laying on him like “I’m going to sleep here now and you’re going to let me because we all know I’m adorable”

(via thelonebear)

storyandsoul:

photoatlas:

Colorado Appreciation Post
“We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us.” ― John Muir

Ugh need to go back…

So ready to be there full-time now. For serious, y’all. storyandsoul:

photoatlas:

Colorado Appreciation Post
“We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us.” ― John Muir

Ugh need to go back…

So ready to be there full-time now. For serious, y’all. storyandsoul:

photoatlas:

Colorado Appreciation Post
“We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us.” ― John Muir

Ugh need to go back…

So ready to be there full-time now. For serious, y’all. storyandsoul:

photoatlas:

Colorado Appreciation Post
“We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us.” ― John Muir

Ugh need to go back…

So ready to be there full-time now. For serious, y’all. storyandsoul:

photoatlas:

Colorado Appreciation Post
“We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us.” ― John Muir

Ugh need to go back…

So ready to be there full-time now. For serious, y’all. storyandsoul:

photoatlas:

Colorado Appreciation Post
“We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us.” ― John Muir

Ugh need to go back…

So ready to be there full-time now. For serious, y’all. storyandsoul:

photoatlas:

Colorado Appreciation Post
“We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us.” ― John Muir

Ugh need to go back…

So ready to be there full-time now. For serious, y’all. storyandsoul:

photoatlas:

Colorado Appreciation Post
“We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us.” ― John Muir

Ugh need to go back…

So ready to be there full-time now. For serious, y’all. storyandsoul:

photoatlas:

Colorado Appreciation Post
“We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us.” ― John Muir

Ugh need to go back…

So ready to be there full-time now. For serious, y’all.

storyandsoul:

photoatlas:

Colorado Appreciation Post

“We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us.” 
― John Muir

Ugh need to go back…

So ready to be there full-time now. For serious, y’all.

(via thelonebear)

Seriously though. I think I have this shirt Seriously though. I think I have this shirt

Seriously though. I think I have this shirt

(via whataboutneil)

Are these for real? How did I not know that jelly wedges existed in this world?! Because, seriously y’all. I need these #throwback #traveldaytuesday #iwantit #ineedit (at Columbus International Airport)

This is so important to me This is so important to me This is so important to me This is so important to me This is so important to me This is so important to me

This is so important to me

(via whataboutneil)

americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


But y’all. This actually happens. People walk outside and stare at the rain. And it is glorious americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


But y’all. This actually happens. People walk outside and stare at the rain. And it is glorious americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


But y’all. This actually happens. People walk outside and stare at the rain. And it is glorious americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


But y’all. This actually happens. People walk outside and stare at the rain. And it is glorious americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


But y’all. This actually happens. People walk outside and stare at the rain. And it is glorious americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


But y’all. This actually happens. People walk outside and stare at the rain. And it is glorious americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


But y’all. This actually happens. People walk outside and stare at the rain. And it is glorious americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


But y’all. This actually happens. People walk outside and stare at the rain. And it is glorious americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


But y’all. This actually happens. People walk outside and stare at the rain. And it is glorious americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


But y’all. This actually happens. People walk outside and stare at the rain. And it is glorious

americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES

I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.

I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster. 

One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.

This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.

Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.

The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September. 

This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.

The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little. 

But more often than not it doesn’t. 

When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest

But y’all. This actually happens. People walk outside and stare at the rain. And it is glorious

(via textless)

americasgreatoutdoors:

Seen on an early morning patrol in Arches National Park: a cottontail transfixed with fear, a snake still too sluggish to strike, and a chipmunk chirping its fool head off.

What happened next, you ask? The bunny hopped away, the patrol ranger escorted the snake safely out of the road, and the chipmunk bored quickly and left. Undramatic, as nature often is — when not scripted for TV.

Photo: National Park Service